Thursday, December 31, 2015

My interview with Steven Okazaki (Black tar Heroin & Heroin Cape Cod USA)

Here is the link click here. I though y'all would be interested.

6 comments:

  1. Great interview Tracie. The article appeared on my flipboard, the day it was published, and I was waiting for you to mention it. I've yet to watch Steven's newest documentary myself. If you've seen Vanguard's "Gateway To Heroin", how do you feel Heroin: Cape Cod compares?

    While the subject matter in Vanguard's documentary was more relateable to me, as my city has also seen the effects of Rx opiate abuse, I was more drawn to you, Oreo, Alice, Jessica, and Jake, in BTH, as people. There was a genuine interest, in your well being, and empathy for the struggles you were going through, living on the streets. Steven did a great job of making the viewer connect with the subjects, of BTH. I'm hoping Steven's newest film, a balance of his former work, and the Vanguard depiction.

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    1. I have not seen gateway to heroin. This film covered more people in a shorter time span so it is more of a snapshot that a study over time

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  2. Finally just watched this, Steven did it again. Despite knowing who makes it, and who doesn't, thanks to reading many different interviews/articles, I felt no less heartbroken, when learning the fate of the subjects, from Heroin: Cape Cod. While Okazaki didn't follow these subjects, for as long as he followed you all in BTH, he still manages to form a relateable narrative, for the viewer. I was no less drawn in and invested in these guys, than I was you and the rest of the BTH cast. Both documentaries are equally important views at opioid addiction, for their time in history.

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    1. I hope Colie can be you, in 18yrs.

      Addiction has touched my family. My uncle is in recovery from alcohol, and coke, while my Dad, from gambling. For my Dad, helping others, is what supported his drive to abstain from gambling. Matt Paxton, who is one of the cleaners from A&E's Hoarders, is also in recovery from Gambling. He has spoken often, on how his occupation of helping others, is his positive way of feeding his addictive behaviors. Instead of gambling, he helps.

      I should already know this, but did you go straight into your field of work, after your recovery? Did you find it was a positive driving force for you? Do you have any statistics to support the likelihood of a recovery success, when it's followed up with helping others attain a sober life, vs those who go into non-service work?

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    2. Yes I volunteered almost right away

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